BROWSE

Related Researcher

Author's Photo

Cho, Gi-Hyoug
Sustainable Urban Plaaning and Design Lab
Research Interests
  • Urban Planning, Urban Design, Travel Behavior, Urban Heat Island , Spatial Analysis

ITEM VIEW & DOWNLOAD

Comparing objective measures of environmental supports for pedestrian travel in adults

Cited 0 times inthomson ciCited 6 times inthomson ci
Title
Comparing objective measures of environmental supports for pedestrian travel in adults
Author
Shay, E.Rodriguez, D.A.Cho, Gi-HyougClifton, K.J.Evenson, K.R.
Issue Date
2009-11
Publisher
BIOMED CENTRAL LTD
Citation
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HEALTH GEOGRAPHICS, v.8, no., pp.1 - 12
Abstract
Background: Evidence is growing that the built environment has the potential to influence walking--both positively and negatively. However, uncertainty remains on the best approaches to representing the pedestrian environment in order to discern associations between walking and the environment. Research into the relationship between environment and walking is complex; challenges include choice of measures (objective and subjective), quality and availability of data, and methods for managing quantitative data through aggregation and weighting. In particular, little research has examined how to aggregate built environment data to best represent the neighborhood environments expected to influence residents' behavior. This study examined associations between walking and local pedestrian supports (as measured with an environmental audit), comparing the results of models using three different methods to aggregate and weight pedestrian features. Methods: Using data collected in 2005-2006 for a sample of 251 adult residents of Montgomery County, MD, we examined associations between pedestrian facilities and walking behaviors (pedestrian trips and average daily steps). Adjusted negative binomial and ordinary least-squares regression models were used to compare three different data aggregation techniques (raw averages, length weighting, distance weighting) for measures of pedestrian facilities that included presence, condition, width and connectivity of sidewalks, and presence of crossing aids and crosswalks. Results: Participants averaged 8.9 walk trips during the week; daily step counts averaged 7042. The three aggregation techniques revealed different associations between walk trips and the various pedestrian facilities. Crossing aids and good sidewalk conditions were associated with walk trips more than were other pedestrian facilities, while sidewalk facilities and features showed associations with steps not observed for crossing aids and crosswalks. Conclusion: Among three methods of aggregation examined, the method that accounted for distance from participant's home to the pedestrian facility (distance weighting) is promising; at the same time, it requires the most time and effort to calculate. This finding is consistent with the behavioral assumption that travelers may respond to environmental features closer to their residence more strongly than to more distant environmental qualities.
URI
https://scholarworks.unist.ac.kr/handle/201301/9847
DOI
10.1186/1476-072X-8-62
ISSN
1476-072X
Appears in Collections:
UEE_Journal Papers
Files in This Item:
2-s2.0-71949088042.pdf Download

find_unist can give you direct access to the published full text of this article. (UNISTARs only)

Show full item record

qrcode

  • mendeley

    citeulike

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

MENU