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Takayama, Shuichi
Cell and Microfluidics Lab
Research Interests
  • Bio-MEMS and Microfluidics
  • Bio-Nanotechnology
  • Biofluids
  • Biomaterials
  • Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

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Fracture-based fabrication of normally closed, adjustable, and fully reversible microscale fluidic channels

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Title
Fracture-based fabrication of normally closed, adjustable, and fully reversible microscale fluidic channels
Author
Kim, Byoung ChoulMoraes, ChristopherHuang, JiexiMatsuoka, ToshikiThouless, M. D.Takayama, Shuichi
Issue Date
2014-10
Publisher
WILEY-V C H VERLAG GMBH
Citation
SMALL, v.10, no.19, pp.4020 - 4029
Abstract
Adjustable fluidic structures play an important role in microfluidic systems. Fracture of multilayered materials under applied tension has been previously demonstrated as a convenient, simple, and inexpensive approach to fabricate nanoscale adjustable structures; here, it is demonstrated how to extend this concept to the microscale. This is achieved by a novel pairing of materials that leverages fracture mechanics to limit crack formation to a specified region, allowing to create size-controllable and adjustable microfluidic structures. This technique can be used to fabricate "normally closed" microfluidic channels that are completely reversible, a feature that is challenging to achieve in conventional systems without careful engineering controls. The adjustable microfluidic channels are then applied to mechanically lyse single cells, and subsequently manipulate the released nuclear chromatin, creating new possibilities for epigenetic analysis of single cells. This simple, versatile, and robust technology provides an easily accessible pathway to construct adjustable microfluidic structures, which will be useful in developing complex assays and experiments even in resource-limited settings
URI
https://scholarworks.unist.ac.kr/handle/201301/9164
URL
http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=84908470600
DOI
10.1002/smll.201400147
ISSN
1613-6810
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