BROWSE

Related Researcher

Author's Photo

Kim, Jaai
School of Urban and Environmental Engineering
Research Interests

ITEM VIEW & DOWNLOAD

Common key acidogen populations in anaerobic reactors treating different wastewaters: Molecular identification and quantitative monitoring

Cited 11 times inthomson ciCited 9 times inthomson ci
Title
Common key acidogen populations in anaerobic reactors treating different wastewaters: Molecular identification and quantitative monitoring
Author
Kim, JaaiShin, Seung GuHan, GyuseongO'Flaherty, VincentLee, ChangsooHwang, Seokhwan
Keywords
Acidogenesis; Aeromonas; Clostridium sticklandii; DGGE; Real-time PCR
Issue Date
2011-04
Publisher
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD
Citation
WATER RESEARCH, v.45, no.8, pp.2539 - 2549
Abstract
Bacterial population dynamics during the start-up of three lab-scale anaerobic reactors treating different wastewaters, i.e., synthetic glucose wastewater, whey permeate, and liquefied sewage sludge, were assessed using a combination of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and real-time PCR techniques. The DGGE results showed that bacterial populations related to Aeromonas spp. and Clostridium sticklandii emerged as common and prominent acidogens in all reactors. Two real-time PCR primer/probe sets targeting Aeromonas or C. sticklandii were developed, and successfully applied to quantitatively investigate their dynamics in relation to changes in reactor performance. Quantitative analysis demonstrated that both Aeromonas- and C. sticklandii-related populations were highly abundant for acidogenic period in all reactors. Aeromonas populations accounted for up to 86.6-95.3% of total bacterial 16S rRNA genes during start-up, suggesting that, given its capability of utilizing carbohydrate, Aeromonas is likely the major acidogen group responsible for the rapid initial fermentation of carbohydrate. C. sticklandii, able to utilize specific amino acids only, occupied up to 8.5-55.2% of total bacterial 16S rRNA genes in the reactors tested. Growth of this population is inferred to be supported, at least in part, by non-substrate amino acid sources like cell debris or extracellular excretions, particularly in the reactor fed on synthetic glucose wastewater with no amino acid source. The quantitative dynamics of the two acidogen groups of interest, together with their putative functions, suggest that Aeromonas and C. sticklandii populations were numerically as well as functionally important in all reactors tested, regardless of the differences in substrate composition. Particularly, the members of Aeromonas supposedly play vital roles in anaerobic digesters treating various substrates under acidogenic, fermentative start-up conditions.
URI
Go to Link
DOI
10.1016/j.watres.2011.02.004
ISSN
0043-1354
Appears in Collections:
UEE_Journal Papers
Files in This Item:
2-s2.0-79953163958.pdf Download

find_unist can give you direct access to the published full text of this article. (UNISTARs only)

Show full item record

qrcode

  • mendeley

    citeulike

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

MENU