BROWSE

Related Researcher

Author's Photo

Jeong, Hoon Eui
Multiscale Biomimetics & Manufacturing Lab
Research Interests
  • Biomimetics
  • Multiscale manufacturing
  • Micro/nanofabrication

ITEM VIEW & DOWNLOAD

Synergistic effects of gelatin and nanotopographical patterns on biomedical PCL patches for enhanced mechanical and adhesion properties

Cited 0 times inthomson ciCited 0 times inthomson ci
Title
Synergistic effects of gelatin and nanotopographical patterns on biomedical PCL patches for enhanced mechanical and adhesion properties
Author
Kim, SujinGwon, YonghyunPark, SunhoKim, WoochanJeon, YubinHan, TaeseongJeong, Hoon EuiKim, Jangho
Issue Date
2021-02
Publisher
Elsevier BV
Citation
JOURNAL OF THE MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF BIOMEDICAL MATERIALS, v.114, pp.104167
Abstract
Biomedical patches have been known as important biomaterial-based medical devices for the clinical treatment of tissue and organ diseases. Inspired by the extracellular matrix-like aligned nanotopographical pattern as well as the unique physical and biocompatible properties of gelatin, we developed strength-enhanced biomedical patches by coating gelatin onto the nanopatterned surface of polycaprolactone (PCL). The relative contributions of the nanotopographical pattern (physical factor) and gelatin coating (chemical factor) in enhancing the mechanical and adhesive properties of PCL were quantitatively investigated. The nanotopographical pattern increased the surface area of PCL, allowing more gelatin to be coated on its surface. The biomedical patch made from gelatin-coated nanopatterned PCL showed strong mechanical and adhesive properties (tensile strength: ~14.5 MPa; Young's modulus: ~60.2 MPa; and normal and shear adhesive forces: ~1.81 N/cm2 and ~352.3 kPa) as well as good biocompatibility. Although the nanotopographical pattern or gelatin coating alone could enhance these physical properties of PCL in both dry and wet environmental conditions, both factors in combination further strengthened the properties, indicating the importance of synergistic cues in driving the mechanical behavior of biomedical materials. This strength-enhanced biomedical patch will be especially useful for the treatment of tissues such as cartilage, tendon, and bone.
URI
https://scholarworks.unist.ac.kr/handle/201301/49296
URL
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1751616120307098?via%3Dihub
DOI
10.1016/j.jmbbm.2020.104167
ISSN
1751-6161
Appears in Collections:
MEN_Journal Papers
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

find_unist can give you direct access to the published full text of this article. (UNISTARs only)

Show full item record

qrcode

  • mendeley

    citeulike

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

MENU