BROWSE

Related Researcher

Author's Photo

Ding, Feng
IBS - Center for Multidimensional Carbon Materials (CMCM)
Research Interests
  • Theoretical methods development for materials studies.
  • The formation mechanism of various carbon materials, from fullerene to carbon nanotube and graphene.
  • Kinetics and thermodynamics of materials growth and etching.
  • The structure, properties and fundamentals of nanomaterials.
  • The experimental synthesis of carbon nanotubes.

ITEM VIEW & DOWNLOAD

The epitaxy of 2D materials growth

Cited 0 times inthomson ciCited 0 times inthomson ci
Title
The epitaxy of 2D materials growth
Author
Dong, JichenZhang, LeiningDai, XinyueDing, Feng
Issue Date
2020-11
Publisher
NATURE RESEARCH
Citation
NATURE COMMUNICATIONS, v.11, no.1, pp.5862
Abstract
Two dimensional (2D) materials consist of one to a few atomic layers, where the intra-layer atoms are chemically bonded and the atomic layers are weakly bonded. The high bonding anisotropicity in 2D materials make their growth on a substrate substantially different from the conventional thin film growth. Here, we proposed a general theoretical framework for the epitaxial growth of a 2D material on an arbitrary substrate. Our extensive density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that the propagating edge of a 2D material tends to align along a high symmetry direction of the substrate and, as a conclusion, the interplay between the symmetries of the 2D material and the substrate plays a critical role in the epitaxial growth of the 2D material. Based on our results, we have outlined that orientational uniformity of 2D material islands on a substrate can be realized only if the symmetry group of the substrate is a subgroup of that of the 2D material. Our predictions are in perfect agreement with most experimental observations on 2D materials' growth on various substrates known up to now. We believe that this general guideline will lead to the large-scale synthesis of wafer-scale single crystals of various 2D materials in the near future. Advances in our ability to manipulate genetics leads to deeper understanding of biological systems. In this perspective, the authors argue that synthetic genomics facilitates complex modifications that open up new areas of research.
URI
https://scholarworks.unist.ac.kr/handle/201301/49016
URL
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-020-19752-3
DOI
10.1038/s41467-020-19752-3
ISSN
2041-1723
Appears in Collections:
MSE_Journal Papers
Files in This Item:
000594731600013.pdf Download

find_unist can give you direct access to the published full text of this article. (UNISTARs only)

Show full item record

qrcode

  • mendeley

    citeulike

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

MENU