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Mitchell, Robert J.
Applied & Environmental Microbiology Lab (AEML)
Research Interests
  • Drug-Resistant Pathogens, Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus, patho-biotechnology

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The production of biofuels from carbonated beverages

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Title
The production of biofuels from carbonated beverages
Author
Dwidar, MohammedLee, SiseonMitchell, Robert J.
Issue Date
2012-12
Publisher
ELSEVIER SCI LTD
Citation
APPLIED ENERGY, v.100, pp.47 - 51
Abstract
Commonly sold carbonated beverages typically contain 110 g/L of sugar. Consequently, this study evaluated the use of four products, including two colas, one diet cola and one lemon-lime flavored beverage from two large distributors world-wide and one local distributor, as fermentative sugar sources. Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 cultures were able to ferment the sugars present, which included sucrose, fructose and glucose, consuming all three completely within about 10 h after addition. The results from each of the beverages tested were similar, except for the diet beverage, with a final ethanol concentrations of around 25 g/L, an average productivity of approximately 2 g*L(-1)h(-1) and average yields of 0.43 g ethanol/g glucose. Using a diet beverage with a fructose-glucose mixture added extraneously, we demonstrated that the beverages were not inhibitory or toxic to the cultures. Subsequent experiments with three clostridial strains showed that these beverages can also be used within fermentative processes to generate butanol and butyric acid. As with Z. mobilis ZM4, Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 were capable of fermenting all three sugars and had final butanol concentrations of 5.3 and 8.7 g/L, respectively. In contrast, Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755 is unable to utilize sucrose as a carbon source. Although limited to only the monosaccharides fructose and glucose, the butyric acid concentration was 15.4 g/L and had a yield of 0.43 g butyrate/g glucose, which is only slightly below the theoretical maximum of 0.47. This study illustrates the potential of using wasted or expired carbonated beverages in the biofuels industry.
URI
https://scholarworks.unist.ac.kr/handle/201301/3563
URL
http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=84867707263
DOI
10.1016/j.apenergy.2012.02.054
ISSN
0306-2619
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BIO_Journal Papers
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