Prevalence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases in the local farm environment and livestock: challenges to mitigate antimicrobial resistance

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Title
Prevalence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases in the local farm environment and livestock: challenges to mitigate antimicrobial resistance
Author
Lee, ShinyoungMir, Raies A.Park, Si HongKim, DonghyukKim, Hae-YeongBoughton, Raoul K.Morris, J. Glenn, Jr.Jeon, Kwangcheol C.
Issue Date
2020-01
Publisher
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD
Citation
CRITICAL REVIEWS IN MICROBIOLOGY
Abstract
The effectiveness of antibiotics has been challenged by the increasing frequency of antimicrobial resistance (AR), which has emerged as a major threat to global health. Despite the negative impact of AR on health, there are few effective strategies for reducing AR in food-producing animals. Of the antimicrobial resistant microorganisms (ARMs), extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs)-producing Enterobacteriaceae are an emerging global threat due to their increasing prevalence in livestock, even in animals raised without antibiotics. Many reviews are available for the positive selection of AR associated with antibiotic use in livestock, but less attention has been given to how other factors including soil, water, manure, wildlife, and farm workers, are associated with the emergence of ESBL-producing bacteria. Understanding of antibiotic resistance genes and bacteria transfer at the interfaces of livestock and other potential reservoirs will provide insights for the development of mitigation strategies for AR.
URI
https://scholarworks.unist.ac.kr/handle/201301/31133
URL
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1040841X.2020.1715339
DOI
10.1080/1040841X.2020.1715339
ISSN
1040-841X
Appears in Collections:
ECHE_Journal Papers
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