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Kang, Joo H.
Translational Multiscale Biofluidics Lab (TMB Lab)
Research Interests
  • Biomedical devices, infectious disease, organ-on-a-chip, microfluidics, mechanobiology

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Advection Flows‐Enhanced Magnetic Separation for High‐Throughput Bacteria Separation from Undiluted Whole Blood

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Title
Advection Flows‐Enhanced Magnetic Separation for High‐Throughput Bacteria Separation from Undiluted Whole Blood
Author
Jung, Su HyunHahn, Young KiOh, SeinKwon, SeyongUm, EujinChoi, SungyoungKang, Joo H.
Issue Date
2018-08
Publisher
WILEY-V C H VERLAG GMBH
Citation
SMALL, v.14, no.34, pp.1801731
Abstract
A major challenge to scale up a microfluidic magnetic separator for extracorporeal blood cleansing applications is to overcome low magnetic drag velocity caused by viscous blood components interfering with magnetophoresis. Therefore, there is an unmet need to develop an effective method to position magnetic particles to the area of augmented magnetic flux density gradients while retaining clinically applicable throughput. Here, a magnetophoretic cell separation device, integrated with slanted ridge-arrays in a microfluidic channel, is reported. The slanted ridges patterned in the microfluidic channels generate spiral flows along the microfluidic channel. The cells bound with magnetic particles follow trajectories of the spiral streamlines and are repeatedly transferred in a transverse direction toward the area adjacent to a ferromagnetic nickel structure, where they are exposed to a highly augmented magnetic force of 7.68 mu N that is much greater than the force (0.35 pN) at the side of the channel furthest from the nickel structure. With this approach, 91.68% +/- 2.18% of Escherichia coli (E. coli) bound with magnetic nanoparticles are successfully separated from undiluted whole blood at a flow rate of 0.6 mL h(-1) in a single microfluidic channel, whereas only 23.98% +/- 6.59% of E. coli are depleted in the conventional microfluidic device.
URI
https://scholarworks.unist.ac.kr/handle/201301/24258
URL
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/smll.201801731
DOI
10.1002/smll.201801731
ISSN
1613-6810
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