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Chung, Dongil
Decision Neuroscience & Cognitive Engineering Lab
Research Interests
  • Decision Neuroscience; Neuroimaging; Neuroeconomics; Decision-making; Social interaction

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Different Gain/Loss Sensitivity and Social Adaptation Ability in Gifted Adolescents during a Public Goods Game

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Title
Different Gain/Loss Sensitivity and Social Adaptation Ability in Gifted Adolescents during a Public Goods Game
Author
Chung, DongilYun, KyongsikKim, Jin HoJang, BosunJeong, Jaeseung
Issue Date
2011-02
Publisher
PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE
Citation
PLOS ONE, v.6, no.2, pp.e17044
Abstract
Gifted adolescents are considered to have high IQs with advanced mathematical and logical performances, but are often thought to suffer from social isolation or emotional mal-adaptation to the social group. The underlying mechanisms that cause stereotypic portrayals of gifted adolescents are not well known. We aimed to investigate behavioral performance of gifted adolescents during social decision-making tasks to assess their affective and social/non-social cognitive abilities. We examined cooperation behaviors of 22 gifted and 26 average adolescents during an iterative binary public goods (PG) game, a multi-player social interaction game, and analyzed strategic decision processes that include cooperation and free-riding. We found that the gifted adolescents were more cooperative than average adolescents. Particularly, comparing the strategies for the PG game between the two groups, gifted adolescents were less sensitive to loss, yet were more sensitive to gain. Additionally, the behavioral characteristics of average adolescents, such as low trust of the group and herding behavior, were not found in gifted adolescents. These results imply that gifted adolescents have a high cognitive ability but a low ability to process affective information or to adapt in social groups compared with average adolescents. We conclude that gain/loss sensitivity and the ability to adapt in social groups develop to different degrees in average and gifted adolescents.
URI
https://scholarworks.unist.ac.kr/handle/201301/23206
URL
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0017044
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0017044
ISSN
1932-6203
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BME_Journal Papers
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