BROWSE

Related Researcher

Author's Photo

Im, Jungho
Intelligent Remote sensing and geospatial Information Science (IRIS) Lab
Research Interests
  • Remote sensing, Geospatial modeling, Disaster monitoring and management, Climate change

ITEM VIEW & DOWNLOAD

CO2 concentration and its spatiotemporal variation in the troposphere using multi-sensor satellite data, carbon tracker, and aircraft observations

Cited 0 times inthomson ciCited 0 times inthomson ci
Title
CO2 concentration and its spatiotemporal variation in the troposphere using multi-sensor satellite data, carbon tracker, and aircraft observations
Author
Lee, SanggyunKim, DongminIm, JunghoLee, Myong-InPark, Young-Gyu
Issue Date
2017-07
Publisher
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD
Citation
GISCIENCE & REMOTE SENSING, v.54, no.4, pp.592 - 6913
Abstract
Satellite-based atmospheric CO2 observations have provided a great opportunity to improve our understanding of the global carbon cycle. However, thermal infrared (TIR)-based satellite observations, which are useful for the investigation of vertical distribution and the transport of CO2, have not yet been studied as much as the column amount products derived from shortwave infrared data. In this study, TIR-based satellite CO2 products – from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), and Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation – and carbon tracker mole fraction data were compared with in situ Comprehensive Observation Network for Trace gases by AIrLiner (CONTRAIL) data for different locations. The TES CO2 product showed the best agreement with CONTRAIL CO2 data resulting in R2 ~ 0.87 and root-mean-square error ~0.9. The vertical distribution of CO2 derived by TES strongly depends on the geophysical characteristics of an area. Two different climate regions (i.e., southeastern Japan and southeastern Australia) were examined in terms of the vertical distribution and transport of CO2. Results show that while vertical distribution of CO2 around southeastern Japan was mainly controlled by horizontal and vertical winds, horizontal wind might be a major factor to control the CO2 transport around southeastern Australia. In addition, the vertical transport of CO2 also varies by region, which is mainly controlled by anthropogenic CO2, and horizontal and omega winds. This study improves our understanding of vertical distribution and the transport of CO2, both of which vary by region, using TIR-based satellite CO2 observations and meteorological variables.
URI
https://scholarworks.unist.ac.kr/handle/201301/21966
URL
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15481603.2017.1317120
DOI
10.1080/15481603.2017.1317120
ISSN
1548-1603
Appears in Collections:
UEE_Journal Papers
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

find_unist can give you direct access to the published full text of this article. (UNISTARs only)

Show full item record

qrcode

  • mendeley

    citeulike

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

MENU