BROWSE

Related Researcher

Author's Photo

Kang, Sarah M.
Climate Dynamics Lab
Research Interests
  • Climate change, ITCZ, Atmospheric general circulation, Polar amplification

ITEM VIEW & DOWNLOAD

Sensitivity of the Climate Response to the Altitude of Black Carbon in the Northern Subtropics in an Aquaplanet GCM

Cited 0 times inthomson ciCited 0 times inthomson ci
Title
Sensitivity of the Climate Response to the Altitude of Black Carbon in the Northern Subtropics in an Aquaplanet GCM
Author
Kim, HanjunKang, Sarah M.Hwang, Yen-TingYang, Young-Min
Issue Date
2015-08
Publisher
AMER METEOROLOGICAL SOC
Citation
JOURNAL OF CLIMATE, v.28, no.16, pp.6351 - 6359
Abstract
This study explores the dependence of the climate response on the altitude of black carbon in the northern subtropics by employing an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to an aquaplanet mixed layer ocean, with a focus on the pattern changes in the temperature, hydrological cycle, and large-scale circulation. Black carbon added below or within the subtropical low-level clouds tends to suppress convection, which reduces the low cloud amount, resulting in a positive cloud radiative forcing. The warmer northern subtropics then induce a northward shift of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) and a poleward expansion of the descending branch of the northern Hadley cell. As the black carbon-induced local warming is amplified by clouds and is advected by the anomalous Hadley circulation, the entire globe gets warmer. In contrast, black carbon added near the surface increases the buoyancy of air parcels to enhance convection, leading to an increase in the subtropical low cloud amount and a negative cloud radiative forcing. The temperature increase remains local to where black carbon is added and elsewhere decreases, so that the ITCZ is shifted southward and the descending branch of the northern Hadley cell contracts equatorward. Consistent with previous studies, the authors demonstrate that the climate response to black carbon is highly sensitive to the vertical distribution of black carbon relative to clouds; hence, models have to accurately compute the vertical transport of black carbon to enhance their skill in simulating the climatic effects of black carbon.
URI
https://scholarworks.unist.ac.kr/handle/201301/16866
URL
http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/abs/10.1175/JCLI-D-15-0037.1
DOI
10.1175/JCLI-D-15-0037.1
ISSN
0894-8755
Appears in Collections:
UEE_Journal Papers
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

find_unist can give you direct access to the published full text of this article. (UNISTARs only)

Show full item record

qrcode

  • mendeley

    citeulike

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

MENU