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Kim, Sung-Phil
Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) Lab
Research Interests
  • Brain-computer interface, Statistical Signal Processing, Neural Code, Neuromarketing

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Distributed functions of detection and discrimination of vibrotactile stimuli in the hierarchical human somatosensory system

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Title
Distributed functions of detection and discrimination of vibrotactile stimuli in the hierarchical human somatosensory system
Author
Kim, JunsukMueller, Klaus-RobertChung, Yoon GiChung, Soon-CheolPark, Jang-YeonBuelthoff, Heinrich H.Kim, Sung-Phil
Issue Date
2015-01
Publisher
FRONTIERS RES FOUND
Citation
FRONTIERS IN HUMAN NEUROSCIENCE, v.8, pp.1 - 10
Abstract
According to the hierarchical view of human somatosensory network, somatic sensory information is relayed from the thalamus to primary somatosensory cortex (Si), and then distributed to adjacent cortical regions to perform further perceptual and cognitive functions. Although a number of neuroirnaging studies have examined neuronal activity correlated with tactile stimuli, comparatively less attention has been devoted toward understanding how vibrotactile stimulus information is processed in the hierarchical somatosensory cortical network. To explore the hierarchical perspective of tactile information processing, we studied two cases: (a) discrimination between the locations of finger stimulation; and (b) detection of stimulation against no stimulation on individual fingers, using both standard general linear model (GLM) and searchlight multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA) techniques. These two cases were studied on the same data set resulting from a passive vibrotactile stimulation experiment. Our results showed that vibrotactile stimulus locations on fingers could be discriminated from measurements of human functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In particular, it was in case (a) we observed activity in contralateral posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and supramarginal gyrus (SMG) but not in Si, while in case; (b) we found significant cortical activations in Si but not in PPC and SMG. These discrepant observations suggest the functional specialization with regard to vibrotactile stimulus locations, especially, the hierarchical information processing in the human somatosensory cortical areas. Our findings moreover support the general understanding that Si is the main sensory receptive area for the sense of touch, and adjacent cortical regions (i.e., PPC and SMG) are in charge of a higher level of processing and may thus contribute most for the successful classification between stimulated finger locations.
URI
https://scholarworks.unist.ac.kr/handle/201301/10723
URL
http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fnhum.2014.01070/abstract
DOI
10.3389/fnhum.2014.01070
ISSN
1662-5161
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BME_Journal Papers
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