BROWSE

Related Researcher

Author

Kwon, Young-Nam
Superior Membrane-based Advanced Research & Technology (SMART) Lab
Research Interests
  • Membrane, Reverse(Forward) osmosis, Membrane distillation, Hydrate-induced ice desalination

ITEM VIEW & DOWNLOAD

Hypochlorite degradation of crosslinked polyamide membranes I. Changes in chemical/morphological properties

Cited 57 times inthomson ciCited 52 times inthomson ci
Title
Hypochlorite degradation of crosslinked polyamide membranes I. Changes in chemical/morphological properties
Author
Kwon, Young-NamLeckie, James O.
Keywords
Chlorine; Crosslinked polyamide; Degradation; Hydrogen bonding; Reverse osmosis
Issue Date
200610
Publisher
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Citation
JOURNAL OF MEMBRANE SCIENCE, v.283, no.1-2, pp.21 - 26
Abstract
When disinfecting or cleaning agents contact polymer-based membranes, hydrolysis and oxidation with the membrane change surface properties. The research reported here discusses the effect of exposure to solution of hypochloric acid (disinfecting agent) on the chemical and morphological properties of a crosslinked polyamide membrane (LFC1, Hydranautics (c)). Effects on the membrane were evaluated using AFM, XPS, FT-IR, contact angle, and streaming potential analysis. Chlorine incorporated in the membrane increased with increasing hypochlorite concentration and decreasing pH of a soaking bath. Exposed membranes were more hydrophilic and had a slightly more negative zeta potential. The chlorination broke and weakened hydrogen bonding by decreasing the number of hydrogen bonding sites. This study shows that the use of chlorine chemically changed the surface properties of the crosslinked polyamide LFC1 membrane, but there was no change in roughness and morphology.
URI
Go to Link
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.memsci.2006.06.008
ISSN
0376-7388
Appears in Collections:
UEE_Journal Papers

find_unist can give you direct access to the published full text of this article. (UNISTARs only)

Show full item record

qr_code

  • mendeley

    citeulike

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

MENU