BROWSE

Related Researcher

Author's Photo

Cho, Gi-Hyoug
Sustainable Urban Plaaning and Design Lab
Research Interests
  • Urban Planning, Urban Design, Travel Behavior, Urban Heat Island , Spatial Analysis

ITEM VIEW & DOWNLOAD

The role of the built environment in explaining relationships between perceived and actual pedestrian and bicyclist safety

Cited 0 times inthomson ciCited 22 times inthomson ci
Title
The role of the built environment in explaining relationships between perceived and actual pedestrian and bicyclist safety
Author
Cho, Gi-HyougRodriguez, D.A.Khattak, A.J.
Keywords
Actual crash risk; Built environment; Pedestrian safety; Perceived crash risk
Issue Date
2009-07
Publisher
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD
Citation
ACCIDENT ANALYSIS AND PREVENTION, v.41, no.4, pp.692 - 702
Abstract
While the conventional approach to safety planning has emphasized crash analysis with police-reported crash information, transportation professionals increasingly recognize the importance of proactively identifying potential crash risk and considering environmental characteristics. In a proactive approach, individuals' perception of crash risk provides important information in identifying potential crash risk. As built environment characteristics influence the levels of pedestrian and bicycle safety, this study examined how perceived and actual crash risk are related with each other and with respect to built environmental characteristics. Our results showed that residents who live in low density-single residential neighborhoods are more likely to perceive their neighborhood as dangerous relative to residents of compact, mixed-use neighborhoods even though the latter exhibited higher actual crash rates. The results of path analyses confirmed that a simultaneous but opposite relationship exists between perceived and actual crash risks. Our results indicate that higher actual crash risk increases perceived crash risk, while higher perceived crash risk is negatively associated to actual crash rates. Consequently, low density and non-mixed land uses increase individuals perception of crash risk, and increased perception of risk and unfriendly environment for pedestrian and bikers reduces actual crash rates as a result of behavioral changes. From a policy standpoint, more attention and proactive interventions are desirable in suburban areas beyond the areas with high crash rates, as some of these areas have high-perceived risks.
URI
https://scholarworks.unist.ac.kr/handle/201301/9850
DOI
10.1016/j.aap.2009.03.008
ISSN
0001-4575
Appears in Collections:
UEE_Journal Papers
Files in This Item:
2-s2.0-67349191477.pdf Download

find_unist can give you direct access to the published full text of this article. (UNISTARs only)

Show full item record

qrcode

  • mendeley

    citeulike

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

MENU