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Suh, Pann-Ghill
BioSignal Network Lab (BSN)
Research Interests
  • Signal transduction, cancer, metabolism, phospholipase C

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O-GlcNAcylation regulates dopamine neuron function, survival, and degeneration in Parkinson disease

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Title
O-GlcNAcylation regulates dopamine neuron function, survival, and degeneration in Parkinson disease
Author
Lee, Byeong EunKim, Hye YunKim, Hyun-JinJeong, HyeongsunKim, Byung-GyuLee, Ha-EunLee, JieunKim, Han ByeolLee, Seung EunYang, Yong RyoulYi, Eugene C.Hanover, John A.Myung, KyungjaeSuh, Pann-GhillKwon, TaejoonKim, Jae-Ick
Issue Date
2020-11
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Citation
BRAIN
Abstract
The dopamine system in the midbrain is essential for volitional movement, action selection, and reward-related learning. Despite its versatile roles, it contains only a small set of neurons in the brainstem. These dopamine neurons are especially susceptible to Parkinson’s disease and prematurely degenerate in the course of disease progression, while the discovery of new therapeutic interventions has been disappointingly unsuccessful. Here, we show that O-GlcNAcylation, an essential post-translational modification in various types of cells, is critical for the physiological function and survival of dopamine neurons. Bidirectional modulation of O-GlcNAcylation importantly regulates dopamine neurons at the molecular, synaptic, cellular, and behavioural levels. Remarkably, genetic and pharmacological upregulation of O-GlcNAcylation mitigates neurodegeneration, synaptic impairments, and motor deficits in an animal model of Parkinson’s disease. These findings provide insights into the functional importance of O-GlcNAcylation in the dopamine system, which may be utilized to protect dopamine neurons against Parkinson’s disease pathology.
URI
https://scholarworks.unist.ac.kr/handle/201301/48676
URL
https://academic.oup.com/brain/advance-article/doi/10.1093/brain/awaa320/5958206
DOI
10.1093/brain/awaa320
ISSN
0006-8950
Appears in Collections:
BIO_Journal Papers
BME_Journal Papers
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