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Jeong, Hoon Eui
Multiscale Biomimetics & Manufacturing Lab
Research Interests
  • Biomimetics
  • Multiscale manufacturing
  • Micro/nanofabrication

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Bacterial Recognition of Silicon Nanowire Arrays

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dc.contributor.author Jeong, Hoon Eui ko
dc.contributor.author Kim, Ilsoo ko
dc.contributor.author Karam, Pierre ko
dc.contributor.author Choi, Heon-Jin ko
dc.contributor.author Yang, Peidong ko
dc.date.available 2014-04-10T02:35:11Z -
dc.date.created 2013-08-20 ko
dc.date.issued 2013-06 -
dc.identifier.citation NANO LETTERS, v.13, no.6, pp.2864 - 2869 ko
dc.identifier.issn 1530-6984 ko
dc.identifier.uri https://scholarworks.unist.ac.kr/handle/201301/4043 -
dc.identifier.uri https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/nl401205b ko
dc.description.abstract Understanding how living cells interact with nanostructures is integral to a better understanding of the fundamental principles of biology and the development of next-generation biomedical/bioenergy devices. Recent studies have demonstrated that mammalian cells can recognize nanoscale topographies and respond to these structures. From this perspective, there is a growing recognition that nanostructures, along with their specific physicochemical properties, can also be used to regulate the responses and motions of bacterial cells. Here, by utilizing a well-defined silicon nanowire array platform and single-cell imaging, we present direct evidence that Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can recognize nanoscale structures and that their swimming patterns and initial attachment locations are strongly influenced by the presence of nanowires on a surface. Analyses of bacterial trajectories revealed that MR-1 cells exhibited a confined diffusion mode in the presence of nanowires and showed preferential attachment to the nanowires, whereas a superdiffusion mode was observed in the absence of nanowires. These results demonstrate that nanoscale topography can affect bacterial movement and attachment and play an important role during the early stages of biofilm formation. ko
dc.description.statementofresponsibility close -
dc.language ENG ko
dc.publisher AMER CHEMICAL SOC ko
dc.subject Fundamental principles ko
dc.subject Nanoscale topography ko
dc.subject Physicochemical property ko
dc.subject Preferential attachments ko
dc.subject Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 ko
dc.subject Silicon nanowire arrays ko
dc.subject Single cells ko
dc.subject Trajectory analysis ko
dc.title Bacterial Recognition of Silicon Nanowire Arrays ko
dc.type ARTICLE ko
dc.identifier.scopusid 2-s2.0-84879071630 ko
dc.identifier.wosid 000320485100090 ko
dc.type.rims ART ko
dc.description.wostc 8 *
dc.description.scopustc 5 *
dc.date.tcdate 2014-10-18 *
dc.date.scptcdate 2014-07-12 *
dc.identifier.doi 10.1021/nl401205b ko
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