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Author

Oakley, Ian
Interactions Lab
Research Interests
  • Interaction Design, Tangible Computing, Social Computing, Multi-modal Interfaces

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Human perception of pneumatic tactile cues

Cited 2 times inthomson ciCited 2 times inthomson ci
Title
Human perception of pneumatic tactile cues
Author
Kim, YeongmiOakley, IanRyu, Jeha
Keywords
Pneumatic tactile display; Psychophysics; Tactile array design; Virtual reality buttons
Issue Date
200808
Publisher
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD
Citation
ADVANCED ROBOTICS, v.22, no.8, pp.807 - 828
Abstract
The ability to combine tactile, on-the-skin, sensory cues with the kinesthetic ones that widely available force-feedback devices are able to produce is a desirable one, opening the door to the production of more realistic, compelling virtual environments. Pneumatic air-jet displays can be easily mounted on existing force-feedback devices and we believe have the potential to provide useful complimentary tactile information. However, there is little concrete psychophysical data relating to pneumatic displays - a fact that hinders their adoption. This paper addresses this challenge, and presents brief psychophysical studies examining localization rate, the two-point threshold and the stimulus intensity of cues produced by pneumatic air jets. Using insights gained from these studies, we also present a more concrete application-focused investigation where we evaluate the effect of combining tactile and force-feedback cues in a simple object manipulation task in a virtual environment. We show that task completion times are significantly improved with the addition of tactile information, validating our ideas and suggesting this topic warrants further attention.
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DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/156855308X314524
ISSN
0169-1864
Appears in Collections:
DHE_Journal Papers

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