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Author

Oakley, Ian
Interactions Lab
Research Interests
  • Interaction Design, Tangible Computing, Social Computing, Multi-modal Interfaces

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Design and evaluation of a head-mounted display for immersive 3D teleoperation of field robots

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Title
Design and evaluation of a head-mounted display for immersive 3D teleoperation of field robots
Author
Martins, HenriqueOakley, IanVentura, Rodrigo
Keywords
Head-Mounted Display; Human factors; Stereopsis; Teleoperation; Urban search and rescue; User study
Issue Date
201512
Publisher
CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS
Citation
ROBOTICA, v.33, no.10, pp.2166 - 2185
Abstract
This paper describes and evaluates the use of a head-mounted display (HMD) for the teleoperation of a field robot. The HMD presents a pair of video streams to the operator (one to each eye) originating from a pair of stereo cameras located on the front of the robot, thus providing him/her with a sense of depth (stereopsis). A tracker on the HMD captures 3-DOF head orientation data which is then used for adjusting the camera orientation by moving the robot and/or the camera position accordingly, and rotating the displayed images to compensate for the operator's head rotation. This approach was implemented in a search and rescue robot (RAPOSA), and it was empirically validated in a series of short user studies. This evaluation involved four experiments covering two-dimensional perception, depth perception, scene perception, and performing a search and rescue task in a controlled scenario. The stereoscopic display and head tracking are shown to afford a number of performance benefits. However, one experiment also revealed that controlling robot orientation with yaw input from the head tracker negatively influenced task completion time. A possible explanation is a mismatch between the abilities of the robot and the human operator. This aside, the studies indicated that the use of an HMD to create a stereoscopic visualization of the camera feeds from a mobile robot enhanced the perception of cues in a static three-dimensional environment and also that such benefits transferred to simulated field scenarios in the form of enhanced task completion times.
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DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S026357471400126X
ISSN
0263-5747
Appears in Collections:
DHE_Journal Papers

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