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Author

Kwon, H. Moo
Inflammation and Kidney Disorder Lab
Research Interests
  • TonEBP, Obesity, Cancer, Chronic inflammatory diseases, Brain disorder, Kidney disorders, Genomic instability

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Cell and molecular biology of organic osmolyte accumulation in hypertonic renal cells

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Title
Cell and molecular biology of organic osmolyte accumulation in hypertonic renal cells
Author
Handler, JSKwon, H. Moo
Keywords
Myo-inositol;  betaine;  sorbitol;  tonicity responsive element;  stress
Issue Date
200102
Publisher
S. Karger AG
Citation
NEPHRON, v.87, no.2, pp.106 - 110
Abstract
When the renal medulla becomes hypertonic in association with the formation of concentrated urine, the cells of the medulla avoid the stress of high intracellular salts by accumulating small non-perturbing organic osmolytes. The response has been studied in most detail in cultured kidney-derived cells, and confirmed in studies of the intact kidney. The non-perturbing osmolytes, myo-inositol, betaine, and sorbitol, are accumulated because of stimulation of the transcription of the genes for the proteins that catalyze their accumulation by transport or synthesis. The genes involved have all been cloned and sequenced and contain tonicity responsive regulatory elements (TonEs) in their 5' region. During hypertonicity, the elements are occupied by TonE-binding protein, a transacting factor that has been cloned and characterized. Current efforts focus on identifying the mechanism by which cells sense hypertonicity and how that leads to activation of TonE-binding protein.
URI
http://scholarworks.unist.ac.kr/handle/201301/4713
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000045897
ISSN
0028-2766
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SLS_Journal Papers
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