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Author

Soper, Steven A.
Soper Research Group
Research Interests
  • Micro- and nano-fabrication

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Microfluidics for the analysis of membrane proteins: How do we get there?

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Title
Microfluidics for the analysis of membrane proteins: How do we get there?
Author
Battle, Katrina N.Uba, Franklin I.Soper, Steven A.
Keywords
CE; Membrane proteins; Microfluidics
Issue Date
201408
Publisher
WILEY-BLACKWELL
Citation
ELECTROPHORESIS, v.35, no.16, pp.2253 - 2266
Abstract
The development of fully automated and high-throughput systems for proteomics is now in demand because of the need to generate new protein-based disease biomarkers. Unfortunately, it is difficult to identify protein biomarkers that are low abundant when in the presence of highly abundant proteins, especially in complex biological samples such as serum, cell lysates, and other biological fluids. Membrane proteins, which are in many cases of low abundance compared to the cytosolic proteins, have various functions and can provide insight into the state of a disease and serve as targets for new drugs making them attractive biomarker candidates. Traditionally, proteins are identified through the use of gel electrophoretic techniques, which are not always suitable for particular protein samples such as membrane proteins. Microfluidics offers the potential as a fully automated platform for the efficient and high-throughput analysis of complex samples, such as membrane proteins, and do so with performance metrics that exceed their bench-top counterparts. In recent years, there have been various improvements to microfluidics and their use for proteomic analysis as reported in the literature. Consequently, this review presents an overview of the traditional proteomic-processing pipelines for membrane proteins and insights into new technological developments with a focus on the applicability of microfluidics for the analysis of membrane proteins. Sample preparation techniques will be discussed in detail and novel interfacing strategies as it relates to MS will be highlighted. Lastly, some general conclusions and future perspectives are presented.
URI
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DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/elps.201300625
ISSN
0173-0835
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