BROWSE

Related Researcher

Author

Takayama, Shuichi
Cell and Microfluidics Lab
Research Interests
  • Bio-MEMS and Microfluidics

ITEM VIEW & DOWNLOAD

Aqueous Two-Phase System-Derived Biofilms for Bacterial Interaction Studies

Cited 10 times inthomson ciCited 7 times inthomson ci
Title
Aqueous Two-Phase System-Derived Biofilms for Bacterial Interaction Studies
Author
Yaguchi, ToshiyukiDwidar, MohammedByun, Chang KyuLeung, BrendanLee, SiseonCho, Yoon-KyoungMitchell, Robert J.Takayama, Shuichi
Keywords
Aqueous two phase; Aqueous two phase system; Bacterial biofilm; Bacterial interactions; Bacterial species; Coculture; Free diffusion; High precision; Lactamases; Microprinting; Non-contact printing; Patterning methods; Planktonic cells; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Small molecules
Issue Date
201209
Publisher
AMER CHEMICAL SOC
Citation
BIOMACROMOLECULES, v.13, no.9, pp.2655 - 2661
Abstract
We describe patterning of bacterial biofilms using polymer-based aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) microprinting protocols. The fully aqueous but selectively bacteria-partitioning nature of the ATPS allows spatially distinct localization of suspensions of bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli with high precision. The ATPS patterned bacterial suspensions form spatially distinct biofilms over time. Due to the fully aqueous and gentle noncontact printing procedures employed, coculture biofilms composed of multiple types of bacteria could be printed not only adjacent to each other but also directly over another layer of existing biofilm. In addition, the ATPS environment also allows free diffusion of small molecules between spatially distinct and localized bacterial suspensions and biofilms. This enables biofilms to chemically affect or be affected by neighboring biofilms or planktonic cells, even if they consist of different strains or species. We show that a beta-lactamase producing biofilm confers ampicillin resistance to neighboring nonresistant planktonic cells, as seen by a 3,600-fold increase in survival of the ampicillin-sensitive strain. These examples demonstrate the ability of ATPS-based biofilm patterning methods to enable unique studies on commensalistic effects between bacterial species
URI
Go to Link
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/bm300500y
ISSN
1525-7797
Appears in Collections:
SLS_Journal Papers

find_unist can give you direct access to the published full text of this article. (UNISTARs only)

Show full item record

qr_code

  • mendeley

    citeulike

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

MENU