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Author

Choi, Sung-Deuk
Environmental Analytical Chemistry Lab (EACL)
Research Interests
  • Persistent organic pollutants, Environmental Analysis and monitoring, Multimedia modeling

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Exploring the Role of Shelf Sediments in the Arctic Ocean in Determining the Arctic Contamination Potential of Neutral Organic Contaminants

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Title
Exploring the Role of Shelf Sediments in the Arctic Ocean in Determining the Arctic Contamination Potential of Neutral Organic Contaminants
Author
Armitage, James M.Choi, Sung-DeukMeyer, TorstenBrown, Trevor N.Wania, Frank
Keywords
Air-water; Arctic contamination potentials; Arctic ocean; Emission scenario; Hydrophobic organic chemicals; Long term simulation; Organic contaminant; Partition coefficient; Pelagic food web; Polychlorinated biphenyl congener; Primary emissions; Shelf sediment; Surface ocean; Total mass
Issue Date
201301
Publisher
AMER CHEMICAL SOC
Citation
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, v.47, no.2, pp.923 - 931
Abstract
The main objective of this study was to model the contribution of shelf sediments in the Arctic Ocean to the total mass of neutral organic contaminants accumulated in the Arctic environment using a standardized emission scenario for sets of hypothetical chemicals and realistic emission estimates (1930-2100) for polychlorinated biphenyl congener 153 (PCB-153). Shelf sediments in the Arctic Ocean are shown to be important reservoirs for neutral organic chemicals across a wide range of partitioning properties, increasing the total mass in the surface compartments of the Arctic environment by up to 3.5-fold compared to simulations excluding this compartment. The relative change in total mass for hydrophobic organic chemicals with log air water partition coefficients >= 0 was greater than for chemicals with properties similar to typical POPs. The long-term simulation of PCB-153 generated modeled concentrations in shelf sediments in reasonable agreement with available monitoring data and illustrate that the relative importance of shelf sediments in the Arctic Ocean for influencing surface ocean concentrations (and therefore exposure via the pelagic food web) is most pronounced once primary emissions are exhausted and secondary sources dominate. Additional monitoring and modeling work to better characterize the role of shelf sediments for contaminant fate is recommended.
URI
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DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es304276g
ISSN
0013-936X
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