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Yi, Huiyuhl
Division of General Studies
Research Interests
  • Metaphysical problems concerning personal identity

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Brueckner and Fischer on the Evil of Death

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Title
Brueckner and Fischer on the Evil of Death
Author
Yi, Huiyuhl
Keywords
Brueckner and Fischer;  Death;  Posthumous nonexistence;  Prenatal nonexistence;  Symmetry argument
Issue Date
201206
Publisher
SPRINGER
Citation
PHILOSOPHIA, v.40, no.2, pp.295 - 303
Abstract
A primary argument against the badness of death (known as the Symmetry Argument) appeals to an alleged symmetry between prenatal and posthumous nonexistence. The Symmetry Argument has posed a serious threat to those who hold that death is bad because it deprives us of life's goods that would have been available had we died later. Anthony Brueckner and John Martin Fischer develop an influential strategy to cope with the Symmetry Argument. In their attempt to break the symmetry, they claim that due to our preference of future experiential goods over past ones, posthumous nonexistence is bad for us, whereas prenatal nonexistence is not. Granting their presumption about our preference, however, it is questionable that prenatal nonexistence is not bad. This consideration does not necessarily indicate their defeat against the Symmetry Argument. I present a better response to the Symmetry Argument: the symmetry is broken, not because posthumous nonexistence is bad while prenatal nonexistence is not, but because (regardless as to whether prenatal nonexistence is bad) posthumous nonexistence is even worse.
URI
http://scholarworks.unist.ac.kr/handle/201301/3413
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11406-011-9328-3
ISSN
0048-3893
Appears in Collections:
DGS_Journal Papers
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