BROWSE

Related Researcher

Author

Bang, In Cheol
Nuclear Thermal-Hydraulics & Reactor Safety Lab
Research Interests
  • Nuclear Thermal-Hydraulics

ITEM VIEW & DOWNLOAD

Feasibility study on molten gallium with suspended nanoparticles for nuclear coolant applications

Cited 1 times inthomson ciCited 1 times inthomson ci
Title
Feasibility study on molten gallium with suspended nanoparticles for nuclear coolant applications
Author
Lee, Seung WonPark, Seong DaeKang, SarahShin, Sang HunKim, Ji HyunBang, In Cheol
Keywords
Absorption cross sections; Centrifugal Forces; Coolant applications; Dispersion methods; Dispersion stability; Fast neutron reactors; Feasibility studies; High thermal conductivity; Lead-bismuth; Liquid gallium; Liquid state; Molten gallium; Nuclear application; Nuclear safety; Passive decay; Room temperature; Safety concerns; Stable dispersions
Issue Date
201206
Publisher
ELSEVIER SCIENCE SA
Citation
NUCLEAR ENGINEERING AND DESIGN, v.247, no., pp.147 - 159
Abstract
After the Fukushima accident, the concerns on nuclear safety are increasing more than ever before. In particular, promising coolants for fast neutron reactors start to become major targets to the nuclear safety issues. Liquid metals such as sodium, sodium-potassium, lead, and lead-bismuth, as well as gallium have been considered as potential coolants in fast reactors. Among them, gallium is in the liquid state even under room temperature, has the lowest melting point (similar to 30 degrees C) and has no explosive reaction with water. However, liquid gallium has a lower thermal conductivity than other liquid metals such as sodium. If nanoparticles were evenly dispersed in liquid gallium, having the higher conductivity the suspended nanoparticles would be expected to produce a highly thermal-conductive coolant for nuclear applications without any safety concerns. At least, it would be promising to adopt the coolant in a safety system like passive decay heat removal system. The present work investigates the feasibility of using liquid gallium with nanoparticles in nuclear applications examining dispersion methods and some of the requirements of nuclear coolants such as absorption cross section, thermal conductivity and viscosity. The key issue of the original idea is whether a stable dispersion can be achieved with various nanoparticles having high thermal conductivities. In the study, the results show that good dispersion stability can be obtained by controlling shear rates based on centrifugal forces.
URI
Go to Link
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nucengdes.2012.02.013
ISSN
0029-5493
Appears in Collections:
MNE_Journal Papers

find_unist can give you direct access to the published full text of this article. (UNISTARs only)

Show full item record

qr_code

  • mendeley

    citeulike

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

MENU