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Author

Chae, Han Gi
Polymer nano-composites and Carbon Fiber Laboratory (P&C Lab)
Research Interests
  • Polymer Physics/ Processing, Carbon Nano-materials, Ultra high performance/ multifuctional nano-composites, Smart textile/ fiber

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Note: Thermal conductivity measurement of individual poly(ether ketone)/carbon nanotube fibers using a steady-state dc thermal bridge method

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Title
Note: Thermal conductivity measurement of individual poly(ether ketone)/carbon nanotube fibers using a steady-state dc thermal bridge method
Author
Moon, JaeyunWeaver, KeithFeng, BoChae, Han GiKumar, SatishBaek, Jong-BeomPeterson, G. P.
Keywords
Design optimization; Engineered fibers; Engineering alloys; Engineering characteristics; Platinum wire; Poly(ether ketone); Room temperature; Thermal bridge; Thermal conductivity measurements
Issue Date
2012
Publisher
AMER INST PHYSICS
Citation
REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS, v.83, no.1, pp.1 - 3
Abstract
Customized engineered fibers are currently being used extensively in the aerospace and automobile industries due to the ability to "design in" specific engineering characteristics. Understanding the thermal conductivity of these new fibers is critical for thermal management and design optimization. In the current investigation, a steady-state dc thermal bridge method (DCTBM) is developed to measure the thermal conductivity of individual poly(ether ketone) (PEK)/carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers. For non-conductive fibers, a thin platinum layer was deposited on the test articles to serve as the heater and temperature sensor. The effect of the platinum layer on the thermal conductivity is presented and discussed. DCTBM is first validated using gold and platinum wires (25 mu m in diameter) over a temperature ranging from room temperature to 400 K with +/- 11% uncertainty, and then applied to PEK/CNT fibers with diverse CNT loadings. At a 28 wt. % CNT loading, the thermal conductivity of fibers at 390 K is over 27 Wm(-1) K-1, which is comparable to some engineering alloys.
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DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3676650
ISSN
0034-6748
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ECHE_Journal Papers
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