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Cha, Dong-Hyun
High-impact Weather Prediction Lab (HWPL)
Research Interests
  • Typhoon Modeling, Regional Climate Modeling, High-impact Weather

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Critical Role of Northern Off-Equatorial Sea Surface Temperature Forcing Associated with Central Pacific El Nino in More Frequent Tropical Cyclone Movements toward East Asia

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Title
Critical Role of Northern Off-Equatorial Sea Surface Temperature Forcing Associated with Central Pacific El Nino in More Frequent Tropical Cyclone Movements toward East Asia
Author
Jin, Chun-SilHo, Chang-HoiKim, Joo-HongLee, Dong-KyouCha, Dong-HyunYeh, Sang-Wook
Keywords
Coastal regions;  East China Sea;  Philippine seas;  Regional climate models;  Sea surface temperature (SST);  Sea surface temperatures;  Tropical cyclone;  Weather research
Issue Date
201304
Publisher
AMER METEOROLOGICAL SOC
Citation
JOURNAL OF CLIMATE, v.26, no.8, pp.2534 - 2545
Abstract
Observational records reveal that the number of tropical cyclones (TCs) approaching East Asia in July-October is positively correlated with sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the equatorial and northern off-equatorial central Pacific (CP) oceans, indicating the significant impact of CP El Nino (CP-EN). Through experiments using a Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model-based regional climate model, this study demonstrates that it is northern off-equatorial CP warming, rather than equatorial CP warming, that effectively induces local anomalous steering flows pertinent to the observed increase in TC activity over East Asia during CP-EN. Sensitivity experiments, in which the prescribed CP-EN-related SST anomaly is confined near the equator, do not capture the observed TC increase over East Asia, whereas those including the off-equatorial region successfully reproduce observed atmospheric and TC variabilities. The off-equatorial CP SST anomaly acts to expand the anomalous cyclonic response in the Philippine Sea farther northward. This produces a tunnel effect in the East China Sea, by which more TCs move to East Asian coastal regions (e.g., east China, Taiwan, Korea, and Japan).
URI
http://scholarworks.unist.ac.kr/handle/201301/2526
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/JCLI-D-12-00287.1
ISSN
0894-8755
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