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Jung, Dooyoung
School of Design and Human Engineering
Research Interests
  • Medicine, Psychology

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Pre-treatment anxiety is associated with persistent chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy in women treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer

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Title
Pre-treatment anxiety is associated with persistent chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy in women treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer
Author
Lee, Kwang-MinJung, DooyoungHwang, HeesungSon, Kyung-LakKim, Tae-YongIm, Seock-AhLee, Kyung-HunHahm, Bong-Jin
Keywords
Anxiety;  Breast cancer;  Incidence;  Neoadjuvant chemotherapy;  Persistent chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy;  Risk factors
Issue Date
201805
Publisher
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD
Citation
JOURNAL OF PSYCHOSOMATIC RESEARCH, v.108, no., pp.14 - 19
Abstract
Objective: Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a frequent adverse reaction caused by chemotherapeutic agents, especially the taxanes. CIPN can persist from months to years after completion of chemotherapy, decreasing quality of life for cancer survivors. The aim of this study was to explore the incidence and risk factors of persistent CIPN among women with breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods: In this prospective study, we recruited women with breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy, including four cycles of docetaxel. Participants reported neuropathic symptoms of tingling/numbness at baseline, at the end of chemotherapy treatment, and at 8 months after completion of chemotherapy. Candidate factors associated with CIPN were assessed before chemotherapy. Results: Among 111 participants, 50 (45.0%) experienced CIPN during chemotherapy, and 21 (18.9%) reported persistent CIPN after chemotherapy. Univariate logistic regression analysis revealed that development of CIPN was significantly associated with pre-treatment numbness (odds ratio [OR], 4.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09–7.40; p =.033), and persistent CIPN was significantly associated with pre-treatment numbness (OR, 3.60; 95% CI, 1.12–11.61; p =.032) and pre-treatment anxiety (OR, 5.02; 95% CI, 1.84–13.70; p =.002). Multivariate analysis indicated that pre-treatment anxiety remained significantly associated with persistent CIPN (OR, 4.01; 95% CI, 1.25–12.87; p =.020). Conclusion: Our results suggested that pre-treatment anxiety might be related to a patient's risk for persistent CIPN in women with breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Further research is required to investigate if interventions targeting pre-treatment anxiety could provide prevention and management for persistent CIPN.
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DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychores.2018.02.012
ISSN
0022-3999
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