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Kim, Guntae
GUNS Lab
Research Interests
  • Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs)& SOE, metal-air batteries, ceramic membranes, PEMFC

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Exsolution trends and co-segregation aspects of self-grown catalyst nanoparticles in perovskites

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Title
Exsolution trends and co-segregation aspects of self-grown catalyst nanoparticles in perovskites
Author
Kwon, OhhoonSengodan, SKim, KyeounghakKim, GihyeonJeong, Hu YoungShin, JeeyoungJu, Young-WanHan, Jeong WooKim, Guntae
Issue Date
201706
Publisher
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP
Citation
NATURE COMMUNICATIONS, v.8, no., pp.15967 -
Abstract
In perovskites, exsolution of transition metals has been proposed as a smart catalyst design for energy applications. Although there exist transition metals with superior catalytic activity, they are limited by their ability to exsolve under a reducing environment. When a doping element is present in the perovskite, it is often observed that the surface segregation of the doping element is changed by oxygen vacancies. However, the mechanism of co-segregation of doping element with oxygen vacancies is still an open question. Here we report trends in the exsolution of transition metal (Mn, Co, Ni and Fe) on the PrBaMn2O5+δ layered perovskite oxide related to the co-segregation energy. Transmission electron microscopic observations show that easily reducible cations (Mn, Co and Ni) are exsolved from the perovskite depending on the transition metal-perovskite reducibility. In addition, using density functional calculations we reveal that co-segregation of B-site dopant and oxygen vacancies plays a central role in the exsolution.
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DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms15967
ISSN
2041-1723
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UCRF_Journal Papers
ECHE_Journal Papers
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