BROWSE

Related Researcher

Author

Park, Jang-Ung
Flexible Nano-electronics & Biotechnology Lab
Research Interests
  • Wireless wearable electronics, flexible electronics, printed electronics, nano-bio interfaces

ITEM VIEW & DOWNLOAD

3D-printable, highly conductive hybrid composites employing chemically-reinforced, complex dimensional fillers and thermoplastic triblock copolymers

Cited 0 times inthomson ciCited 0 times inthomson ci
Title
3D-printable, highly conductive hybrid composites employing chemically-reinforced, complex dimensional fillers and thermoplastic triblock copolymers
Author
Jo, YejinKim, Ju YoungKim, So-YunSeo, Yeong-HuiJang, Kwang-SukLee, Su YeonJung, SungmookRyu, Beyong-HwanKim, Hyun-SukPark, Jang-UngChoi, YoungminJeong, Sunho
Issue Date
201704
Publisher
ROYAL SOC CHEMISTRY
Citation
NANOSCALE, v.9, no.16, pp.5072 - 5084
Abstract
The use of 3-dimensional (3D) printable conductive materials has gained significant attention for various applications because of their ability to form unconventional geometrical architectures that cannot be realized with traditional 2-dimensional printing techniques. To resolve the major requisites in printed electrodes for practical applications (including high conductivity, 3D printability, excellent adhesion, and low-temperature processability), we have designed a chemically-reinforced multi-dimensional filler system comprising aminefunctionalized carbon nanotubes, carboxyl-terminated silver nanoparticles, and Ag flakes, with the incorporation of a thermoplastic polystyrene-polyisoprene-polystyrene (SIS) triblock copolymer. It is demonstrated that both high conductivity, 22 939 S cm(-1), and low-temperature processability, below 80 degrees C, are achievable with the introduction of chemically anchored carbon-to-metal hybrids and suggested that the highly viscous composite fluids employing the characteristic thermoplastic polymer are readily available for the fabrication of various unconventional electrode structures by a simple dispensing technique. The practical applicability of the 3D-printable highly conductive composite paste is confirmed with the successful fabrication of wireless power transmission modules on substrates with extremely uneven surface morphologies.
URI
Go to Link
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c6nr09610g
ISSN
2040-3364
Appears in Collections:
MSE_Journal Papers

find_unist can give you direct access to the published full text of this article. (UNISTARs only)

Show full item record

qr_code

  • mendeley

    citeulike

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

MENU