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Suh, Pann-Ghill
BioSignal Network Lab (BSN)
Research Interests
  • Signal transduction, cancer, metabolism, phospholipase C

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Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Psychological Stress and Cancer

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Title
Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Psychological Stress and Cancer
Author
Shin, Kyeong JinLee, Yu JinYang, Yong RyoulPark, SeorimSuh, Pann-GhillFollo, Matilde YungCocco, LucioRyu, Sung Ho
Keywords
Psychological stress; cancer; tumor microenvironment; adrenergic receptor; catecholamine; anticancer drug
Issue Date
201605
Publisher
BENTHAM SCIENCE PUBL LTD
Citation
CURRENT PHARMACEUTICAL DESIGN, v.22, no.16, pp.2389 - 2402
Abstract
Psychological stress is an emotion experienced when people are under mental pressure or encounter unexpected problems. Extreme or repetitive stress increases the risk of developing human disease, including cardiovascular disease (CVD), immune diseases, mental disorders, and cancer. Several studies have shown an association between psychological stress and cancer growth and metastasis in animal models and case studies of cancer patients. Stress induces the secretion of stress-related mediators, such as catecholamine, cortisol, and oxytocin, via the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis or the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). These stress-related hormones and neurotransmitters adversely affect stress-induced tumor progression and cancer therapy. Catecholamine is the primary factor that influences tumor progression. It can regulate diverse cellular signaling pathways through adrenergic receptors (ADRs), which are expressed by several types of cancer cells. Activated ADRs enhance the proliferation and invasion abilities of cancer cells, alter cell activity in the tumor microenvironment, and regulate the interaction between cancer and its microenvironment to promote tumor progression. Additionally, other stress mediators, such as glucocorticoids and oxytocin, and their cognate receptors are involved in stress-induced cancer growth and metastasis. Here, we will review how each receptor-mediated signal cascade contributes to tumor initiation and progression and discuss how we can use these molecular mechanisms for cancer therapy
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DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1381612822666160226144025
ISSN
1381-6128
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SLS_Journal Papers
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